Advanced Vehicles & Fuels

Zero- and Low-Emission Vehicles in U.S. Carsharing Fleets: Impacts of Exposure on Member Perceptions

Document Date: 
Tue, 2015-09-22
Number of pages: 
19

The California Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Mandate, adopted in 1990, was aimed at increasing the sale and dissemination of low- or zero-emission vehicles throughout the California auto market. ZEVs include plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHVs) and all-electric vehicles (EVs). In an attempt to accelerate the exposure of ZEVs in the general population, in 2001, additional credits were allotted to automakers in return for placing ZEVs into transportation networks, such as carsharing fleets. This policy is set to end in 2018.

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Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Driver Response in a Real World Setting: Study of a Northern California Transit Bus Fleet

Document Date: 
Fri, 2014-08-01
Number of pages: 
10
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Additional Authors (Non-TSRC): 
Ananda Gray-Stewart
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An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California

Document Date: 
Fri, 2004-07-09
Number of pages: 
74

This paper concerns the economic and environmental challenges confronting California and the potential role for clean energy systems and hydrogen as an energy carrier in helping to address these challenges. Hydrogen in particular has recently gained great attention as part of a set of solutions to a variety of energy and environmental problems -- and based on this potential the current high level of interest is understandable.

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Additional Authors (Non-TSRC): 
Joan Ogden
Anthony Eggert
Peter Lehman
David Shearer,
Suggested Citation: 

Lipman, Timothy, Dan Kammen, Joan Ogden, Daniel Sperling, Anthony Eggert, Peter Lehman, Susan Shaheen and David Shearer (2004). “An Integrated Hydrogen Vision for California.” 

The greenhouse gas emissions from market-mediated land use change are uncertain, but potentially much greater than previously estimated

Document Date: 
Tue, 2010-09-28
Number of pages: 
7

The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions induced by increased biofuel consumption are highly uncertain: individual estimates vary from each other and each has a wide intrinsic error band. Using a reduced-form model, we estimated that the bounding range for emissions from indirect land-use change (ILUC) from US corn ethanol expansion was 10 to 340 g CO2 MJ-1. Considering various probability distributions to model parameters, the broadest 95% central interval, i.e., between the 2.5 and 97.5%ile values, ranged from 21 to 142 g CO2e MJ-1.

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Additional Authors (Non-TSRC): 
Andrew D. Jones
Margaret S. Torn
Holly K. Gibbs
Suggested Citation: 

Plevin, Richard, Michael O'Hare, Andrew Jones, Margaret Tom, and Holly Gibbs, (2010). "The greenhouse gas emissions from market-mediated land use change are uncertain, but potentially much greater than previously estimated."

Reconciling Top-down and Bottom-up Modelling on Future Bioenergy Deployment

Document Date: 
Sun, 2012-03-04
Number of pages: 
8

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) assesses the role of bioenergy as a solution to meeting energy demand in a climate-constrained world. Based on integrated assessment models, the SRREN states that deployed bioenergy will contribute the greatest proportion of primary energy among renewable energies and result in greenhouse-gas emission reductions.

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Suggested Citation: 

Creutzig, Felix, Alexander Popp, Richard Plevin, Gunnar Luderer, Jan Minx, and Ottmar Edenhofer, (2012). "Reconciling Top-down and Bottom-up Modelling on Future Bioenergy Deployment," Nature Climate Change 2, pp. 320-327.

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Consumption: Sustainable Approaches for Surface Transportation

Document Date: 
Fri, 2007-06-01
Number of pages: 
15

Climated change is rapidly becoming known as a tangible issue that must be addressed to avoid major environmental consequences in the future. Recent change in public opinion has been caused by the physical signs of climate change--melting glaciers, rising sea levels, more severe storm and drought events, and hotter average global temperatures annually. Transportation is a major contributor of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions from human activity, accounting for approximately 14 percent of total anthropogenic emissions globally and about 27 percent in the U.S.

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Dynamics in Behavioral Response to a Fuel Cell Vehicle Fleet and Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure: An Exploratory Study

Document Date: 
Thu, 2007-11-15
Number of pages: 
17

Transportation is a major contributor of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions from human activity. It accounts for approximately 14% of total anthropogenic emissions globally and about 27% in the United States. Growing concern regarding the impacts of climate change and greenhouse gas emissions has led to innovations in automotive and fuel technology. However, behavioral response to the newest transportation technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) and fueling infrastructure, is not well understood.

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Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure

Document Date: 
Sat, 2008-11-15
Number of pages: 
17

Over the last several decades, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) have recently emerged as a zero tailpipe-emission alternative to the battery electric vehicle (EV). FCVs have some important differences from gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles, and they have only been on the road for a few years. There are key questions about consumer reaction and response to operations and refueling. This paper presents the results of a "ride-and-drive" clinic series (n=182) held in 2007 with a Mercedes-Benz A-Class "F-Cell" hydrogen FCV.

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