Carsharing

Carsharing and Partnership Management: An International Perspective

Susan Shaheen, PhD, Daniel Sperling, and Conrad Wagner
1999

Most cars carry one person and are used for less than one hour per day. A more economically rational approach would be to use vehicles more intensively. Carsharing, in which a group of people pay a subscription plus a per-use fee, is one means of doing so. Carsharing may be organized through affinity groups, large employers, transit operators, neighborhood groups, or large carsharing businesses.

Carsharing: Niche Market or New Pathway?

Daniel Sperling and Susan Shaheen, PhD
1999

The premise of carsharing is simple.  Households access, as needed, a fleet of shared-use vehicles.

Dynamics in Behavioral Adaptation to a Transportation Innovation: A Case Study of Carlink–A Smart Carsharing System

Susan Shaheen, PhD
1999

Most trips in U.S. metropolitan regions are drive-alone car trips, an expensive and inefficient means of moving people. A more efficient system would allow drivers to share cars. Such a system is often less convenient for travelers, but convenience can be enhanced by deploying “smart” technologies in concert with shared-use vehicles and transit.

Carlink: A Smart Carsharing System— A Study of Behavioral Adaptation

Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D
2000

Most trips in U.S. metropolitan regions are drive-alone car trips, an expensive and inefficient transportation form. A more efficient, but often less convenient, system allows drivers to share cars. Carsharing organizations are becoming common throughout Europe and North America. Shared-use vehicles offer a modal alternative that can make metropolitan regions more livable.

Carlink – A Smart Carsharing System Field Test Report

Susan Shaheen, Ph.D., John Wright, David Dick, and Linda Novick
2000

Most trips in U.S. metropolitan regions are driven alone, which is costly to individuals and society and leads to congestion and air pollution. A more efficient, but less convenient system would allow drivers to share cars. A shared-use system aims to reduce traffic by reducing the number of cars needed by households and encouraging commuters to walk, bike, and use transit, at least for part of their trips. For commuters especially, shared-use vehicles could offer a low-cost, low-hassle alternative to private vehicles.

CarLink Economics: An Empirically-Based Scenario Analysis

Susan Shaheen, PhD and Robert Uyeki
2000

Most cars carry one person and are used for less than one hour per day. A more economically rational approach would be to use vehicles more intensively. Carsharing, in which a group of people pay a subscription plus a per-use fee, is one such strategy. Smart carsharing employs advanced technology to facilitate tracking, billing, and system management. CarLink, a smart carsharing system, was deployed in the San Francisco Bay Area for ten months in 1999 to test this concept.

The CarLink II Pilot Program: Examining the Viability of Transit-Based Carsharing

Susan Shaheen, PhD and John Wright
2001

The automobile is the dominant travel mode throughout the U.S., while transit accounts for less than four percent of market share. Between these principal modes, niche markets exist for other transportation services, such as transit feeder shuttles and carsharing. Commuter-based carsharing, in which individuals share a fleet of vehicles linked to transit, could potentially fill and expand one such niche, complement existing services, and develop into an economically viable transportation alternative.

The CarLink II Pilot Program: Testing a Commuter-Based Carsharing Model

Susan Shaheen, PhD and John Wright
2001

The automobile is the dominant travel mode throughout the U.S., while transit accounts for less than four percent of market share. Between these principal modes, niche markets exist for other transportation services, such as transit feeder shuttles and carsharing. Commuter-based carsharing, in which individuals share a fleet of vehicles linked to transit, could potentially fill and expand one such niche, complement existing services, and develop into an economically viable transportation alternative.

Commuter-Based Carsharing: Market Niche Potential

Susan Shaheen, PhD
2001

The automobile accounts for more than 95 percent of all person miles traveled in the United States, whereas transit accounts for less than three percent of all trips. Between the private automobile and traditional transit, niche markets exist for other transportation services, such as airport and transit feeder shuttles and carsharing.

CarLink II: Research Approach and Early Findings

Susan Shaheen, Ph.D, John Wright
2001

In this report, the authors describe the key differences between the CarLink I and CarLink II models; describe in detail how feedback from focus groups guided and refined various aspects of the CarLink II project – both for marketing and logistics; and, in the appendix, the authors present the protocol and summary of each focus group.